Sterling Brown Answers the Most Important Question in The Screen Actor’s Guild Awards Press Room

when we consider the importance of having diverse images on the screen, and equal pay wages for actors who perform equal task, we must also consider that we should have more equality in media. We should have fair access. The perpetrator of this is not some white man or woman in a board room, but it is a system that few have recognized or acknowledged as 2x SAG Award Winner Sterling K. Brown admits in this clip. Like so many other things that have been systematic in our community, our adoption or ignorance of such makes us a party to the crime and share in the guilt of the systemic results. Example, yes Reagan/Bush/Oliver North flooded South Central with Crack Cocaine to fund a off the record war with Nicaragua, for that the gov’t is guilty. Many of our own people took those same drugs and sold them not only their neighbors but also their own family members destroying the fabric of our communities by allowing ourselves to be victimized by the gov’t. For that we are guilty. So when we talk about equality in media, their is a systemic system that segregates opportunities, access, media buys (revenue) based on color, but their is also no effort to rectify those disparities from some of our biggest stars that have the opportunity to wield their star power to promote, acknowledge, support those same outlets that they choose to walk past on the carpet or who they let their publicist choose to ignore for opportunities. Yesterday’s SAG awards was a great example, so was last week’s NAACP awards, (Just for those of you that will say “get your own awards show”, for which I have many rebuttals but I won’t crowd this post with that conversation). There were only a small number of black owned or operated media outlets on the carpet to begin with so before I name all the black stars that walked by Eurweb, Hip Hollywood, Black Hollywood Live, American Urban Radio Networks (AURN) and BlackTree TV, I will acknowledge those who did choose to stop. Thank you Jennifer Lewis, thank you Amanda Warren, thank you Marcus Scribner, thank you Sydelle Noel, thank you Vicky Jeudy, thank you Betty Gabriel, Dion Cole, Marcus Henderson, Rob Morgan, Jason George, thank you Eric Baker, heck thank you Nicole Kidman and all of the other actors of other ethnicities that decided to stop by and talk to us. We are thankful. I think it is worth pointing out that among the black owned and operated outlets that I named, none of these black actors stopped by to discuss and many wouldn’t even turn to wave at our cameras: Traci Ellis Ross, Lupita Nyong’o, Daniel Kaluuya, Halle Berry, Yara Shahidi, Anthony Anderson, Mary J. Blige, Sterling K. Brown, Morgan Freeman, Caleb McLaughlin, Niecy Nash, Denzel Washington (in his defense I am not sure if he talked to anybody). Some of these names are some of the biggest stars in the world, and all of them couldn’t find the time to talk to the black press? I am sure some of them had valid reasons why, but this happens far too often. That coupled with the already limited opportunity from a limited number of outlets spells an industry that is in danger of becoming extinct. One of the biggest winners of the night was Gary Oldman who won for his role as Winston Churchill, excellent performance. Winston Churchill once wrote “History will be kind to us because we are going to write it”. What are we as a people going to do when we don’t have anybody that looks like us to write our story? How will history look upon us?

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